Записки сумасшедшего (Diary of a Madman), opera in one act after Gogol (unfinished)

Libretto by the composer
Total duration of the finished excerpts: ca. 23 minutes
Estimation of the total duration of the finished opera: ca. 70 – 75 minutes
Cover picture: Illustration of the novel “Diary of a Madman”) by Ilya Repin

It has for many years been a dream of mine to turn Gogol’s short story Diary of a Madman into a one-act opera for only one singer and orchestra; an opera which will in this respect be comparable to Poulenc’s La Voix Humaine and Schönberg Erwartung.

Gogol’s story depicts a low-level clerk’s gradual descent into madness, eventually leading to his confinement in a mental asylum. Starting with a journal entry dated as The Year 2000, 43rd of April, the second half of the work chronicles the worsening of his condition, starting with the moment that he arrives to the conclusion that he is the new king of Spain. The story ends with his total breakdown, due to the brutal way he is being treated in the asylum.

What makes the story so well suited for opera in general is the gradual unfolding of the drama towards its inescapable climax. Furthermore, Gogol’s own words can directly be turned into a libretto, as it is possible to abridge Gogol’s text by ca. 60% while still retaining nearly every step of the worsening of the protagonist’s mental condition.

And besides all this there is something that makes the story extremely interesting to be turned into a 21st century opera. We now have an incredible amount of musical idioms and atmospheres at our disposal that can be used to depict everything ranging from the harmonious and tonal to the disharmonious and atonal. This implies that the madman’s gradually increasing mental instability can be musically underlined by music that is becoming more and more atonal and dissonant during the course of the opera; the gradual increase in dissonance being alternated by moments where a general mood of sad solitude is musically depicted, illustrating the madman’s troubled soul. Gogol’s Diary of a Madman is just waiting to be transformed into precisely such an opera. In my estimation, this is nothing short of a golden idea, the realisation of which, if carried out well, cannot fail to have a considerable impact.

Thanks to having been offered an amount of money to make a start, I have been able to draft  a concept libretto, consisting of 19 diary entries or scenes, and to set a number of these to music. This score consists of the beginning of the opera, followed by scenes 2, 4, 5, 9, 10 and 11. From the very start of the music, the music reflects a certain degree of mental instability. In scenes 9 – 11, it can be heard that this instability has increased: the music has become either atonal or still tonal, but in a rather ‘unhinged’ way. Scene 12 is the abovementioned Year 2000, 43rd of April entry, where the madman has come to the conclusion that he is Spain’s new king. From this moment on, the music will be yet more disharmonious than before, and very eerie; to give a bit of an idea: somewhat like Rodion Shchedrin’s music for the ballet The Seagull. The last scene, however, depicting the hero’s total breakdown, will be very emotional and tragic.

There are two songs of mine that play an important part in this opera. The first one is a song called Der Wahnsinn (The Madness), taken from my song cycle Lieder und Tänze der Nacht (Songs and Dances of the Night), which can be found on Youtube. The other is called Lyubovnaya Pyesnya (Love Song), on a poem by Nikolai Nikolev. The beginning of this last poem is quoted in Gogol’s story, and I set it to music just before embarking on the music for the opera itself, as to have the necessary themes connected with the protagonist’s love for the director’s daughter.

In the music composed so far, I haven’t made much use of brass and percussion. I saved that for later on: there will be a lot of – mostly muted – brass and mysterious sounding percussion in the second half of the opera, from the 43rd of April on….

CAST

Сумасшедший / Madman:     Tenor

LIST OF PLAYERS

Piccolo I = Flute III
Flutes I, II
Oboe I
Oboe II = English Horn
Eb Clarinet = Clarinet II in Bb
Clarinet I in Bb
Bass Clarinet in Bb = Clarinet III in Bb
Bassoons I, II

Trumpet I, II
Horns I, II in F
Trombones I, II
Tuba

Harp
Keyboard

Percussion I:    Timpani, Woodblock
Percussion II:   Woodblock, Bass Drum, Marimba

Violins I
Violins II
Violas
Violoncellos
Double Basses (half of which going down to low C)

About the composition The Final Liberation of Man

I recently came across this article, called Cursus in Conspiracy on the website tribute.nu. In addition to this well-written article, there are two PDF files to be found of a so-called ‘Manual’ or, in Dutch, ‘Handleiding’. When you open the English file, it becomes clear that the full title is VIRE US, A PAN- AND ACA-DEMIC STEP-BY-STEP MANUAL TO HELP SPREAD AWARENESS. Soon after the outbreak of the current virus I wrote the article More about Coming to Light, outlining why I have the feeling that there is something very dark behind it. However, the ‘Manual’ not only dives a lot deeper into this aspect than I do in my article, it also takes the reader ‘by the hand’ on a ‘step-by-step’ journey into the darkness, in doing so hopefully rendering it suitable for family members and friends of persons who know what is actually going on, with the rational logic of a chess player. I personally think that, contrary to my own article, this document proves beyond the shadow of a doubt that the current pandemic situation has been planned since a number of years, if not decades. Since I think this information is of crucial importance, I have taken it upon me the help spread the document by making it accessible also on my website. An English version can be read and downloaded here and a Dutch version here.

To quote the author:

I am a member of a group that wishes to remain anonymous. We as a group have collected the information as outlined in this manual and we feel the urge to share it with as many readers as possible. We feel that this is a way in which we can contribute to influencing the outcome of what is now happening globally and therefore we don’t want to keep this knowledge to ourselves any longer.

I have taken it upon me to shape the information we gathered collectively into the manual that you are about to read. It is a step-by-step manual that is meant to help spread awareness. Fortunately, the number of people who are aware of what is actually happening is growing. It needs to increase even more, though, especially between now and 2022. We hope that this document will be helpful in contributing to this.

At the end of his manual, the author suggests that we come out of our comfort zones. What is unfolding now can be compared with Thomas Mann’s brilliant novel Der Zauberberg (The Magic Mountain). During the whole of this novel, protagonist Hans Castorp is living in his comfort zone bubble of a mountainous health resort, isolated from the outside world, because he may or may not have been infected with tuberculosis. At the very end of the novel, though, it suddenly turns out that in the outside world, World War I has erupted, and he is enlisted as a soldier to go to the front – where he will very probably die, according to the novel’s author. What is needed now is peaceful disobedience on a massive scale and therefore, spreading information like this is now crucial.

I also concur with what the author states in page 29 of the Manual: I am not suicidal, nor have I ever been and will I ever be. And my immune systems is functioning just fine. I do not give my consent to being infected or being harmed by any other means as described in Project Zephr (see page 8 of the Manual) or otherwise. So, I count on it that no harm will done to me or to my family, nor to anyone spreading this article, thereby making clear that he or she doesn’t consent to being harmed either.

Furthermore, here is some more recent information, partly about foreknowledge of governments around the world, interesting for investigative journalists. And finally, I found a comprehensive article on the internet, partly overlapping my findings and partly providing new information. Once you start investigating, the amount of indications pointing toward the virus being a preplanned event are endless. Here is the original Dutch version and here an English translation.

As this information may be depressing, I wrote the composition ‘The Final Liberation of Man‘ as to help to keep up high spirits. Here is more information about this composition and when you scroll down, you will find links to downloadable mp3s of the music.

The Final Liberation of Man, for Mixed Chorus and Symphony Orchestra (2020)

A composition, based on the last song of my Fünf Lieder nach Texten Franz Kafkas (Five Songs after Texts by Franz Kafka), ‘Nach dem Gewitter’ (‘After the Thunderstorm’), to celebrate the eventual positive outcome of the 2020 pandemic situation and to keep up high spirits. Here is the melody with text:

An electronic recording of the composition can be heard here. And a longer version can be heard here. I often listen to this longer version during my 20 minute morning run.

Bright Side Overture, for fanfare orchestra, op. 92

In opdracht van en geschreven voor het Orkest Koninklijke Marechaussee ter gelegenheid van zijn 70-jarig jubileum op 12 april 2020
Opgedragen aan het Orkest Koninklijke Marechaussee en Peter Kleine Schaars

Ik voel me zeer vereerd met de uitnodiging van dirigent Peter kleine Schaars om voor zijn orkest Koninklijke Marechaussee een stuk te componeren ter gelegenheid van hun 70-jarig jubileum. Zijn suggestie om er een bekend trompetsignaal in te verwerken heb ik met veel plezier gevolgd.

Het resultaat is geworden een ouverture, geschreven in de zogeheten sonatevorm, met in de expositie drie onderling verwante thema’s, waarvan de eerste twee snel en de laatste langzaam. De thema’s worden afgewisseld met het trompetsignaal Bereden wapens. Dit signaal speelt ook in de doorwerking een belangrijke rol en verschijnt in de reprise uiteindelijk in contrapunt met het langzame thema.

Ik hoop dat het instuderen, het uitvoeren en het beluisteren van deze compositie net zoveel plezier mag brengen als ik heb gehad met het schrijven ervan.

Eduard de Boer, oktober 2019

Youtube:

In preparation: Angelus Koraalvariaties (Angelus Choral Variations), for fanfare orchestra, op. 91

In deze compositie zal het koraal Angelus van Georg Joseph (ca. 1630 – ca. 1668) centraal staan. Ik stel me de volgende opbouw voor: het werk zal bestaan uit een inleiding, waarin de zowel dit koraalthema wordt geëxposeerd als ook een thema dat aan het eind van het stuk als fugathema zal dienen. Hierna volgen een viertal variaties en tenslotte een finale in de vorm van een fuga.

In de 19e eeuw schreef dominee Henry Twells (1823 – 1900) een passende tekst bij Georg Joseph’s melodie, een tekst die hij baseerde op Lukas 4, de verzen 40 en 41:

  1. Toen de zon onderging, brachten allen die zieken hadden, door allerlei kwalen gekweld, deze zieken bij Hem; en Hij legde ieder van hen de handen op en genas hen.
  2. Ook gingen er van velen demonen uit, die schreeuwden en zeiden: U bent de Christus, de Zoon van God! Maar Hij bestrafte hen en liet hun niet toe te spreken, omdat zij wisten dat Hij de Christus was.

Lukas 4 begint met het beroemde verhaal van de verzoeking in de woestijn. Jezus weerstaat de verleiding van de duivel en gaat daarna in virtute Spiritus, gesterkt door de kracht van de Geest, terug naar Galilea, waar hij begint met prediken en met zijn wonderbaarlijke genezingen.

Let There Be Light Again, A Stairway to Heaven, for brass, percussion and unison chorus ad libitum, op. 94

 The famous words Let There Be Light Again are taken from the so-called Speech of the Unknown Man, on July 4, 1776, during an assembly dedicated to signing the Declaration of Independence, which would declare America to be a free country and no longer a colony of Great Britain. In the words of an eye-witness:

In the old State House in Philadelphia, a group of men were gathered for the momentous task of severing the tie between the old country and the new. It was a grave moment, and not a few of those present feared that their lives would be the forfeit for their audacity. In the midst of the debate a fierce voice rang out. The debaters stopped and turned to look upon the stranger. Who was this man who had suddenly appeared in their midst and had transfixed them with his oratory? They had never seen him before, none knew when he had entered; but his tall form and pale face filled them with awe. His voice ringing with a holy zeal, the stranger stirred them to their very souls. His closing words rang. through the building, ’God has given America to be free!’ As the stranger sank into a chair exhausted, a wild enthusiasm burst forth. Name after name was placed upon the parchment: the Declaration of Independence was signed. But where was the man who had precipitated the accomplishment of this immortal task — who had lifted for a moment the veil from the eyes of the assemblage and revealed to them a part at least of the great purpose for which the new nation was conceived? He had disappeared, nor was he ever seen or his identity established.

The electrifying speech stirred the reluctant signers of the Declaration of Independence into action. They all overcame their fear and enthusiastically signed the document. Legend has it that the ‘Unknown Man’ was in fact an apparition of Count of Saint Germain, according to some an spiritually highly advanced so-called ‘ascended master’. Whoever he was, he ended his now famous speech with these words:

God has given the American continent to the free–the toiling millions of the human race–as the last altar of the rights of man on the globe–the home of the oppressed, forevermore!

When conductor Lute Hoekstra asked me to write a composition having to do with America for the Dutch Regimentsfanfare ’Garde Grenadiers en Jagers’ (Regiment Fanfare Gard Grenadiers and Hunters), I found inspiration in this wonderful story. I imagined a composition akin to Edward Elgar’s great Pomp and Circumstance March Nr. 1, with its famous Trio section tune, to which Arthur C. Benson added the lyrics of Land of Hope and Glory. I slightly altered the closing words of the Speech of the Unknown Man, as to add meter and rhyme:

Let there be light again.
Let there be a New World, when
God has given America to the free.
As an altar of the rights
For which man fought many fights,
God has given America to thee. 

Forevermore,
Forevermore,
God wants His people to be free,
Forevermore,
Forevermore,
God has given America to thee,
To be free!

To these words I composed a tune for the B section of my composition. As is also the case in Elgar’s March, my composition has a lively A section. In this part, the opening of George Gershwin’s song A Gateway to Paradise is quoted, next to the Let there be light again motive.

In the closing section of the score, a Unison Chorus part has been added, which can either be sung, by a choir and / or by the audience, but which can also be left out.

Youtube:

Tombeau voor Hans Kox, op. 87 nr. 3. Version for two pianos

This short tribute to my former composition teacher Hans Kox, which I composed for and played during his funeral service,  connects the opening bars of his opera The Portrait of Dorian Gray with motifs of two medieval songs from the Carmina Burana Codex, namely Celum non Animum and Procurans Odium. The central theme of both songs is stabilitas, the Latin word for steadfastness, cannot be taken off its course, not even by negativity from outside. This was a central theme in Hans’ life, and to his steadfastness we owe the above-mentioned exquisite opera and all his other music.

The piece was originally composed for piano solo. I wrote this version a bit later.

Tombeau voor Hans Kox, op. 87 nr. 3. Version for piano solo

This short tribute to my former composition teacher Hans Kox, which I composed for and played during his funeral service,  connects the opening bars of his opera The Portrait of Dorian Gray with motifs of two medieval songs from the Carmina Burana Codex, namely Celum non Animum and Procurans Odium. The central theme of both songs is stabilitas, the Latin word for steadfastness, cannot be taken off its course, not even by negativity from outside. This was a central theme in Hans’ life, and to his steadfastness we owe the above-mentioned exquisite opera and all his other music.

There is also a version for two pianos.

Die geschlossene Tür. Fünf Lieder für hohe Stimme und Klavier, Op. 93

I. Die Rote Jacke
II. Die geschlossene Tür
III. Meine Mutter in der Küche
IV. Erwachsenenalter
V. Der Kirschbaum

After the death of Mimi Deckers-Dijs (1936 – 2013), a well-known theologian and also my mother-in-law, a large number of poems emerged that she had written in the course of her life. Her husband and her oldest daughter took the initiative to compile an anthology from them and to release them in book form. And I selected a number of her poems with the intention of putting them to music.

This song cycle is the first result of this. The poems are about a traumatic event in early childhood and about the way in which this event affects later life. With penetrating words, Mimi Deckers-Dijs expresses her feelings, both from the perspective of her as a child and from her as an adult.

The poems have been translated into German by me, because in my opinion the expressive power of Mimi’s words fits very well with the German language. In addition, having done so creates a certain distance from the words that Mimi has written but never brought out herself.

Sjaak Deckers, oldest son of Mimi, has made it possible for me to compose this cycle of songs. I would like to thank him very much for this.

Na het overlijden van Mimi Deckers-Dijs (1936 – 2013), een bekende theologe en tevens mijn schoonmoeder, kwam er een groot aantal gedichten boven water, die ze in de loop van haar leven geschreven had. Haar echtgenoot en haar oudste dochter namen het initiatief om er een bloemlezing uit samen te stellen en deze in boekvorm uit te brengen. En zelf koos ik een aantal van haar gedichten uit met de bedoeling deze op muziek te zetten.

Deze liederencyclus is het eerste resultaat hiervan. De gedichten gaan over een traumatische gebeurtenis in de vroege jeugd en over de manier waarop deze gebeurtenis doorwerkt in het latere leven. Met indringende woorden geeft Mimi Deckers-Dijs uitdrukking aan haar gevoelens, zowel vanuit het perspectief van haar als kind als ook van haar als volwassene.

De gedichten zijn door mij in het Duits vertaald, omdat de expressieve kracht van Mimi’s woorden naar mijn gevoel heel goed past bij de Duitse taal. Daarnaast schept dit een zekere afstand tot de woorden die Mimi heeft geschreven maar nooit zelf naar buiten bracht.

Sjaak Deckers, oudste zoon van Mimi, heeft het me mogelijk gemaakt deze liederencyclus te componeren. Ik wil hem graag heel hartelijk hiervoor bedanken.

Nach dem Tod von Mimi Deckers-Dijs (1936 – 2013), einer bekannten Theologin und auch meiner Schwiegermutter, tauchte eine Vielzahl von Gedichten auf, welche sie im Laufe ihres Lebens geschrieben hatte. Ihr Ehemann und ihre älteste Tochter ergriffen die Initiative, daraus eine Anthologie zusammenzustellen und in Buchform zu veröffentlichen. Einige ihrer Gedichte habe ich dann ausgewählt, um diese zu vertonen.

Dieser Liederzyklus ist das erste Ergebnis daraus. Die Gedichte handeln von einem traumatischen Ereignis in der frühen Kindheit und davon, wie sich dieses Ereignis auf das spätere Leben ausgewirkt hat. Mit eindringlichen Worten drückt Mimi Deckers-Dijs ihre Gefühle aus, sowohl aus ihrer Perspektive als Kind als auch als Erwachsene.

Die Gedichte wurden von mir ins Deutsche übersetzt, da die Ausdruckskraft von Mimis Worten meiner Meinung nach sehr gut zur deutschen Sprache passt. Außerdem entsteht so eine gewisse Distanz zu den Worten, die Mimi geschrieben, aber nie selber an die Öffentlichkeit brachte.

Sjaak Deckers, der älteste Sohn von Mimi, hat es mir ermöglicht, diesen Liederzyklus zu komponieren. Dafür möchte ich ihm recht herzlich danken. 

DE GESLOTEN DEUR DER GESCHLOSSENE TÜR THE CLOSED DOOR
I. Het rode jasje

Mama had het gemaakt.
Het roodkapjasje.
Mama maakte alles.
Mama maakte altijd kleren die namen hadden.
Laatst op zondagmorgen,
de Tiroler jurk.
Zij wachtte in haar jurk met papa totdat hij klaar was.
En toen liepen zij samen in de zon naar de kerk.

En toen gebeurde op een dag het vreemde.
Mama was weg. Zomaar weg met een grote meneer.
Zij stond bij de tafel in de kamer en huilde.
Waarom huilde ze. Ze hoefde toch niet weg.
Als die man niet lief voor haar was
kon ze toch blijven?
Ze huilde.

Het rode jasje
leek zo weinig roodkapjes rood.

I. Die rote Jacke

Mama hat sie gemacht.
Die Rotkäppchen-Jacke.
Mama machte alles.
Mama machte immer Kleider, die Namen hatten.
Vor kurzem am Sonntagmorgen,
das Tiroler Kleid.
Sie wartete in ihrem Kleid mit Papa, bis er fertig war.
Und dann gingen sie zusammen in der Sonne zur Kirche.

Und dann passierte eines Tages das Eigenartige.
Mama war weg. Einfach so, mit einem großen Herrn.
Sie stand am Tisch im Zimmer und weinte.

Warum weinte sie? Sie musste doch nicht gehen.
Wenn dieser Mann nicht nett zu ihr wäre, könnte sie doch bleiben?
Sie weinte.

Die rote Jacke
schien so wenig Rotkäppchen-rot.

I. The red jacket

Mama had made it.
The Little Red Riding Hood jacket.
Mommy made everything.
Mama always made clothes that had names.
The other day, on Sunday morning,
the Tyrolean dress.
She waited in her dress with Dad until he was ready.
And then they walked to the church, together in the sun.

And then one day the strange thing happened.
Mama was gone. Just gone, with a big gentleman.
She was standing at the table in the room and crying.
Why was she crying? She didn’t have to leave.
If that man wasn’t kind to her,
she could just stay?
She was crying.

The red jacket
seemed so little Red Riding Hood red.

II. De gesloten deur

zo lang geleden
gisteren
was ik het kind
staande aan de deur die klemde

sneeuwvoetstappen op de mat
de deur ging nooit open

die middag huilde mijn moeder
stond bij de tafel
met haar zwarte hoed op
uit te leggen
dat ze weg moest
weg uit ons huis
weg van mijn vader
weg van mij

ze huilde
en ik zei
dat als ze wilde blijven
dat van mij mocht
dat ik lief zou zijn
liever
liefst

ze ging

de deur naar buiten wilde niet open
ik weet van de sneeuw op de mat
maar of ik schreeuwde
huilde
om mijn moeder riep?

mijn moeder liep weg
en nu nog steeds
ben ik haar godverlaten kind

altijd bang het lieve te verliezen
achter te blijven
voor een gesloten deur.

II. Die geschlossene Tür

so lange her
gestern
war ich das Kind
und stand an der Tür, die klemmte

Schneefußspuren auf der Matte
die Tür öffnete sich nie

an diesem Nachmittag weinte meine Mutter
stand am Tisch
trug ihren schwarzen Hut
und erklärte
dass sie gehen musste
weg von unserem Haus
weg von meinem Vater
weg von mir

sie weinte
und ich sagte
dass, wenn sie bleiben wolle
sie dürfe doch bleiben
dass ich süß sein würde
süßer
am süßesten

sie ging

die Tür nach draußen würde sich nicht öffnen
ich weiß noch über den Schnee auf der Matte
aber ob ich schrie
weinte
um meine Mutter rief?

meine Mutter ging weg
und jetzt noch immer
bin ich ihr gottverlassenes Kind

immer ängstlich, das Liebe zu verlieren
zurück zu bleiben
für eine geschlossene Tür.

II. The closed door

so long ago
yesterday
I was the child
standing at the door that was stuck

snow footsteps on the mat
the door never opened

that afternoon my mother cried
standing at the table
wearing her black hat
and explaining
that she had to leave
away from our house
away from my father
away from me

she was crying
and I said
that if she wanted to stay
she could just stay
that I would be sweet
sweeter
sweetest

she went

the door to the outside would not open
I still know about the snow on the mat
but whether I screamed
wept
cried for my mother?

my mother walked away
and still to this day
I am her godforsaken child

always afraid of losing what is lovely
to be left behind
before a closed door.

III. Mijn moeder in de keuken

Mijn moeder in de keuken
– wat is ze lief mijn moeder –
ze bezweert me niets te zeggen
aan mijn vader.
Wat niet te zeggen?
vaag in mijn herinnering
een vreemde man
voor mij van geen belang
speelgoed voor grote mensen

Mijn vader die me wakker maakt
– wat is hij lief mijn vader –
hij vraagt
was er bezoek vandaag
ja, zeg ik, vaag
de vreemde man beschrijvend
was ik wakende of weer in slaap

besef ik nu dan mijn verraad
ik had mijn moeder niet begrepen
nu niet
nooit

III. Meine Mutter in der Küche

Meine Mutter in der Küche
– wie süß sie ist meine Mutter –
sie beschwört mir nichts
zu meinem Vater zu sagen.
Was nicht zu sagen?
verschwommen  in meiner Erinnerung
ein fremder Mann
für mich ohne Bedeutung
Spielzeug für Erwachsene

Mein Vater, der mich aufweckt
– wie süß er ist mein Vater –
er fragt
gab es heute Besuch
ja, sage ich, vage
den fremden Mann beschreibend
war ich wach oder wieder schlafend

erkenne ich nun meinen Verrat
ich habe meine Mutter nicht verstanden
jetzt nicht
niemals

III. My mother in the kitchen

My mother in the kitchen
– how sweet she is my mother –
she beseeches me to say nothing
to my father.
What not to say?
vague in my memory
a strange man
of no interest to me
toys for grown-ups

My father waking me up
– how sweet he is my father –
he asks
was there a visitor today
yes, I say, vaguely
describing the strange man
was I awake or asleep again

Do I now realize my betrayal
I didn’t understand my mother
not now
never

IV. Volwassenheid

Misschien leven de kinderen
wel stil aan het verdriet voorbij
huilen een wanhopig ogenblik
vergeten dan
en spelen verder
zich verliezende
in schone schijn

in het diepst
van hun ziel
slaan zij de feiten
klaar en helder op

en eindelijk volwassen
jaren later
bouwen zij een kooi
van koperen tralies
groen geworden angst
gepantserde ramen

trachten te vergeten
spelenderwijs te overleven
is slechts kinderen gegeven

volwassen
staat een mens
groot en rechtop voor zijn verdriet

de deur klemt weer
kan men haar openbreken?

IV. Erwachsenenalter

vielleicht leben die Kinder
stille an der Trauer vorbei
weinen einen verzweifelten Moment
vergessen dann
und spielen weiter
sich verlierend
im schönen Schein

im tiefsten
ihrer Seelen
speichern sie die Fakten
klar und eindeutig

und endlich erwachsen
Jahre später
bauen sie einen Käfig
von Kupferstangen
grün gewordener Angst
gepanzerte Fenster

versuchen zu vergessen
spielend zu überleben
ist nur Kinder gegeben

einmal erwachsen
steht ein Mensch
groß und aufrecht vor seinem Kummer

die Tür steckt wieder fest
kann man sie aufbrechen?

IV. Adulthood

Maybe the children live
silently beyond sorrow
they cry for a desperate moment
and then they forget
and continue playing
losing themselves
in beautiful appearance

in the deepest
of their souls
they store the facts
clearly and plainly

and finally grown-up
years later
they build a cage
of copper bars
fear turned green
armoured windows

trying to forget
playfully surviving
is only given to children

once an adult
a human being
stands tall  and upright before his grief

the door is stuck again
can it be forced open?

V. De Kersenboom

De kersenboom in onze tuin
pronkt zich de blauwe hemel in
– ontroerend bruidsboeket in mei –

de winter wilde dit jaar
maar niet wijken
en in ons hart ontstond
vertwijfeld vragen
of dit jaar de woestijn
nog zou verdwijnen
het gras weer groen zou worden
en ik vreesde dat de bomen
nooit meer zouden spruiten

en nu ineens dat tere blauw
mei-blauw
niet nader te benoemen
en uit de bermen wijkt de dood
en samen met het groen
begin ook ik opnieuw te leven.

V. Der Kirschbaum

Der Kirschbaum in unserem Garten
protzt in den blauen Himmel hinein
– berührender Hochzeitsstrauß im Mai –

Der Winter wollte dieses Jahr
nicht nachgeben
und in unserem Herz entstand
ein verzweifeltes Fragen
ob dieses Jahr die Wüste
noch verschwinden würde
ob das Gras wieder grün werden würde
und ich fürchtete, dass die Bäume
nie wieder sprießen würden

und jetzt plötzlich dieses zarte Blau
Mai-blau
nicht näher zu deuten
und der Tod weicht von den Seitenstreifen
und zusammen mit dem Grün
fange auch ich an wieder zu leben.

V. The cherry tree

The cherry tree in our garden
is showing off into the blue sky
– a moving wedding bouquet in May –

this year, winter
didn’t want to yield
and in our hearts arose
a desperate questioning
whether this year the wasteland
would disappear
whether the grass would turn green again
and I feared that the trees
would never sprout again

and now suddenly this delicate blue
May-blue
impossible to determine
and death is departing from the berm
and together with the vegetation
I also start living again.

Übersetzung: Eduard de Boer, mit Dank an Ricardo Döniger für seine Hilfe Translation: Eduard de Boer

En el Reino del Sueño (In the Realm of Sleep), for alto saxophone, vibraphone, violoncello, contrabass and piano, op. 90 nr. 1

Commissioned for the Senttix project and Mr. Pedro Arcas by the Asociación Amigos de la Música de Yecla, Spain

My friend Ángel Hernandez Azorín came up with a suggestion to compose a piece about sleeping and dreaming, for an unusual combination of instruments: alto saxophone, vibraphone, violoncello, contrabass and piano. This idea resulted in a benign commission from the matrasses factory Ecus in Yecla.

The composition describes a night with sleeping and dreaming, and finally awakening with new energy and vigour. There are three movements:

  1. Durmiendo (Sleeping), for alto saxophone, contrabass and piano. A movement with a tranquil and peaceful atmosphere
  2. Soñando. (Dreaming), for violoncello, vibraphone and piano. About processing occurrences of the past day. At times, the atmosphere is somewhat surreal.
  3. Nueva Aurora (A New Dawn), for all instruments. Having slept well and having benefited from dreaming has brought new vigour and energy for a bright new day.

It has been a great pleasure to write this composition, about a phenomenon we all know so well.

Youtube:

Het is Feest! (It’s a Feast!), for large or amplified children’s choir and piano four hands

Commissioned by and dedicated to Albert Wissink and the Koorschool Midden-Gelderland, for the occasion of their 100-year jubilee
Composed for the day of the children’s choirs of the Koorschool Midden-Gelderland, February 8, 2020

Het is Feest

Het is feest!
Het is feest!
Een feest zoals er zelden is geweest!
De hele stad is opgefleurd,
Met vlaggen en slingers ingekleurd.
Er hangen posters in elke straat,
Met bonte letters van groot formaat,
Waarop iedereen leest:
Het is feest!
Het is feest!

De beiaardier speelt op het klokkenspel
En er is kermis, mét een carrousel.
De ijscoman die is niet wijs:
Hij geeft de kinderen gratis ijs,
Maar hij geniet misschien nog wel het aller, allermeest!
Ja, het is feest!

Het is feest!
Het is feest!
Een feest zoals er zelden is geweest!
De hele stad is opgefleurd,
Met vlaggen en slingers ingekleurd.
Er hangen posters in elke straat,
Met bonte letters van groot formaat,
Waarop iedereen leest:
Het is feest!
Het is feest!

Op ‘t marktplein speelt een harmonieorkest.
De dirigent doet vreselijk zijn best.
De menigte wordt enthousiast
Bij ‘t klinken van de Koningsmars.
Uit duizend kelen klinkt het, en bepaald niet bedeesd:
Wat een feest!

Het is feest!
Het is feest!
Een feest zoals er zelden is geweest!
De hele stad is opgefleurd,
Met vlaggen en slingers ingekleurd.
Er hangen posters in elke straat,
Met bonte letters van groot formaat,
Waarop iedereen leest:
Het is feest!
Het is feest!
Hoera!

Concert Overture Mindia 2020, for symphonic wind orchestra

In this Concert Overture Mindia 2020, I have made use of thematic material from an earlier composition, entitled Mindia. I wrote it in response to a request from the Symphonic Wind orchestra Nordrhein-Westfalen to compose a concert overture-like piece for their late 2020 concert series. When I started with the actual composing, the first signs of spring became noticeable, along with the first signs of a possible ‘pandemic’. As I am living in a small and beautiful village, surrounded by nature, both elements became sources of inspiration for this work, which in a sense is a follow-up on an earlier piece, entitled Coming to Light, which I wrote in 2015.

Mindia is the hero from the epic poem The Snake Eater by the Georgian poet Vazha Psavela (1861-1915). Being the leader of his people somewhere in Northern Georgia, he has received the psychic gift of being able to understand the voices of nature.

The composition’s structure is a free adaptation of a sonata form, albeit that the First Theme section is the more melodic one, contrary to the Romantic tradition which implies that the Second Theme is the Gesangsthema. In order to end the composition with this melodic (and heroic) theme, the Recapitulation is inversed. As a result, the structure is an overlap of six movements and one umbrella sonata form. Here is an overview of the six parts:

I. Spring Awakening (Introduction)
Nature is awakening. The first flowers appear, birds start to sing, frogs and crickets can be heard, etc.
II. Enter Mindia (Exposition, First Theme)
Mindia is welcomed with joy by all animals, trees and plants.
III. Panic and Grief (Exposition, Second Theme)
Suddenly, the animals, trees, plants, and also Mindia himself, feel a worrying sickness in the air. Birds are dying while flying and falling out of the air, trees and plants are beginning to wither (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LjT-HmuzYPg, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DSt6WuyMvSg & https://www.7sky.life/new-insights-and-revelations-5g-australian-fires-and-more/). The whole of nature begs Mindia to find out what is happening and to help.
IV. Agitation (Development Section)
Back home, Mindia is informed about both a so-called ‘pandemic’ and about a new type of microwave radiation being let loose on the world population. He hears things like: ‘All citizens need to be vaccinated, without exceptions.’ ‘No mass gatherings until mass vaccinations.’ ‘Please snitch on your neighbour and report him to the police if he leaves the house. In this case, snitching is good and will be rewarded.’ ‘Authorities may have to enter homes and remove family members, presumably by force.’ (https://www.facebook.com/sloan.bella.98/videos/vb.100008990262255/2277679575875029/?type=2&theater) Thanks to his psychic gifts, Mindia immediately understands what is actually happening (https://childrenshealthdefense.org/news/5g-the-big-picture/) and he starts to inform as many people as he can, imploring them to wake up to the impending danger.
V. Attack (Reversed Recapitulation, Second Theme)
The globalists, reinforced by the military and the police, start acting upon what they have threatened to do. However, thanks to Mindia, many citizens have by now become aware of the actual evil plans behind the facade of civilly formulated words. They start uniting and resisting.
VI. Victory (Reversed Recapitulation, First Theme)
The people of the world are victorious and the globalists are being stripped of their power.

At the moment of writing, what has actually happened is everything up to the fourth movement and the beginning of the fifth. The last one and half movements are a product of my wishful thinking. It is certain that in the end, the good will always be victorious. I do hope this will be soon.

Youtube:

Sta op en Schitter (Rise up and Shine). Version for symphonic wind orchestra

Sta op en Schitter (Arise and Shine) was originally composed for the Dutch students’ chamber orchestra Ricciotti Ensemble, for their 2019 tour in Georgia, and subsequently arranged for symphonic wind orchestra and for full symphony orchestra. Sta op en Schitter is a famous quote from Isaiah 60: 1, and I chose this title for several reasons:

  • It was inspired by several Georgian legends about heroes, like Mindia, The Knight in the Panther’s Skin, St. George and Amirani.
  • Georgia was one of the first countries in the world to become a Christian nation, as long ago as in the 4th
  • I spent the summer holidays of 2013 in Georgia, together with my family, and we camped for one week in the wild in the Caucasus. To Arise and Shine is precisely what the gorgeous Georgian nature inspires one to do.
  • Sta op en Schitter was the motto of my mother-in-law, who was able to fight cancer during 14½ years, before she finally succumbed to it, one month after my family’s holiday in Georgia.

All in all, Sta op en Schitter is first of all an ode to the beautiful country of Georgia and its wonderful people. While it doesn’t actually quote any Georgian traditional melody, it does make extensive use of the characteristics of Georgian harmony and polyphony and Caucasian rhythms. However, there is a broader context as well, in the sense of my mother-in-law’s  motto: to rise up and shine is always a heroic thing to do, regardless of one’s circumstances.

Youtube:

There are also versions for small symphony orchestra and for full symphony orchestra

Sta op en Schitter (Rise up and Shine). Version for full symphony orchestra

Sta op en Schitter (Arise and Shine) was originally composed for the Dutch students’ chamber orchestra Ricciotti Ensemble, for their 2019 tour in Georgia, and subsequently arranged for full symphony orchestra and for symphonic wind orchestra. Sta op en Schitter is a famous quote from Isaiah 60: 1, and I chose this title for several reasons:

  • It was inspired by several Georgian legends about heroes, like Mindia, The Knight in the Panther’s Skin, St. George and Amirani.
  • Georgia was one of the first countries in the world to become a Christian nation, as long ago as in the 4th
  • I spent the summer holidays of 2013 in Georgia, together with my family, and we camped for one week in the wild in the Caucasus. To Arise and Shine is precisely what the gorgeous Georgian nature inspires one to do.
  • Sta op en Schitter was the motto of my mother-in-law, who was able to fight cancer during 14½ years, before she finally succumbed to it, one month after my family’s holiday in Georgia.

All in all, Sta op en Schitter is first of all an ode to the beautiful country of Georgia and its wonderful people. While it doesn’t actually quote any Georgian traditional melody, it does make extensive use of the characteristics of Georgian harmony and polyphony and Caucasian rhythms. However, there is a broader context as well, in the sense of my mother-in-law’s  motto: to rise up and shine is always a heroic thing to do, regardless of one’s circumstances.

Youtube:

There are also versions for small symphony orchestra and for symphonic wind orchestra.

Sta op en Schitter (Rise up and Shine). Version for small symphony orchestra

Sta op en Schitter (Arise and Shine) was composed for the Dutch students’ chamber orchestra Ricciotti Ensemble, for their 2019 tour in Georgia. Sta op en Schitter is a famous quote from Isaiah 60: 1, and I chose this title for several reasons:

  • It was inspired by several Georgian legends about heroes, like Mindia, The Knight in the Panther’s Skin, St. George and Amirani.
  • Georgia was one of the first countries in the world to become a Christian nation, as long ago as in the 4th
  • I spent the summer holidays of 2013 in Georgia, together with my family, and we camped for one week in the wild in the Caucasus. To Arise and Shine is precisely what the gorgeous Georgian nature inspires one to do.
  • Sta op en Schitter was the motto of my mother-in-law, who was able to fight cancer during 14½ years, before she finally succumbed to it, one month after my family’s holiday in Georgia.

All in all, Sta op en Schitter is first of all an ode to the beautiful country of Georgia and its wonderful people. While it doesn’t actually quote any Georgian traditional melody, it does make extensive use of the characteristics of Georgian harmony and polyphony and Caucasian rhythms. However, there is a broader context as well, in the sense of my mother-in-law’s  motto: to rise up and shine is always a heroic thing to do, regardless of one’s circumstances.

Youtube:

There are also versions for full symphony orchestra and for symphonic wind orchestra.

Mindia

Inspired by Vazha Pshavela’s Epic Poem

Commissioned by the Dutch Fund for the Podium Arts NFPK

During the summer holidays of 2013, while in Georgia for the first time, I chanced upon a number of poems of Vazha Pshavela, an outstanding Georgian poet, born in the second half of the nineteenth century in the Northern Caucasus. I felt immediately attracted to a poem called The Snake Eater (1901), about the tragic fate of its hero Mindia, in the Northern mountainous region of Khevsureti. I started investigating and transcribing Khevsur folk music, which I found to possess the same stark beauty as Pshavela’s poem.

After the summer holidays, I approached the wind orchestra Koninlijke Harmonie Mheer and their conductor Fried Dobbelstein with the ideas to write a composition, inspired by the Mindia story, for symphonic wind orchestra. Just before the holidays, this orchestra had given an outstanding performance of my Caucasian Epode, during the World Music Contest WMC that takes place every four years in the Dutch town of Kerkrade. Fried and the orchestra reacted positively to the idea and eventually, in the spring of 2014, our combined efforts resulted in a grant from the Dutch Fund for the Podium Arts NFPK, which enabled me to start with the actual composing.

This composition deals with the first section of the poem, starting with Mindia in captivity and ending when he has returned to his people. It is subdivided in seven continuous movements:

I. Captive
For twelve years Mindia has been held captive by the Kajis, a tribe consisting of evil sorcerers. He feels sad and lonely, missing his parents, kin and cherished friends and his beloved land of Khevsureti with its snow-capped mountains, its winding paths and murmuring streams. With time he has lost all faith and hope of ever seeing his homeland again. He longs to find relief in death from his miseries and pain.

II. The Cauldron
A cauldron full of serpent’s meat, the Kajis’ favourite dish, now attracts his attention. Mindia believes that if he will eat of it, it will turn to poison in his veins and by killing him free him from his captivity. Finally he picks up enough courage to eat a piece of the loathsome meat.

III. Voices of Nature
But instead of dying something entirely different happens to him. He finds that he can suddenly understand the language of all nature’s creatures: of birds, plants, trees, animals, streams and rocks.

IV. The Kajis’ Fury
The Kajis are furious that Mindia has discovered the secret of their magical skills. But they know they now have lost their power over him.

V. Return Home
Being now skilled in the Kajis’ magic, Mindia can simply leave them. He returns to his tribe in Khevsureti, where his family and friends are overjoyed to see him back.

VI. Feast
A festive Khevsur dance in honour of Mindia’s return.

Youtube:

My eventual aim is to cover the whole of Pshavela’s great poem by writing four more Mindia compositions.

See also:
Dance of Celebration from ‘Mindia’. Version for Symphony Orchestra
Dance of Celebration from Mindia. Version for Symphonic Wind Orchestra
Festive Dance from Mindia

More about the composition Coming to Light

My take on the outbreak of and the events surrounding the outbreak of the corona virus is that they have a direct connection with 9-11 and with small group of people calling themselves ‘elite’. This has prompted me to write this article and to post it on this website.

Fortunately, there is a lot I needn’t explain, because this has been done in the fantastic documentary Out of Shadows:

This documentary takes the viewer step by step ever deeper into an ever deeper rabbit-hole. As I wrote at the time, my composition Coming to Light (2013) (scroll down for a link to the premiere performance), based on an earlier composition entitled Walpurgisnacht, was written with a Satanic abuse ritual in mind, as this is a phenomenon that needs to come to light above all else.

In recent years, ever more people have begun to speak out about the gruesome practices involving children that are described in the documentary. Once you have watched it, and your conclusion is that there might be just a slight chance that what is being presented is true, then you are faced with the choice: do I want to increase the group that is aware of this possibility, as a first step toward stopping it? Or do you prefer to look the other way, thereby running the risk that you let this Satanic system, if indeed it exists, continue?

How is it that I agree to a large extent with what is presented in this documentary? For me, it all started a number of years after 9-11, when I discovered that nothing about the official MSM story about what has happened, how it could happen, who were to blame, etc. makes any sense. (Who still believes the official narrative, please watch for instance this: https://thefreethoughtproject.com/physics-report-911-controlled-demolition/?fbclid=IwAR1kNdNc1HyEYvNl0yoVhejTFXEVci7LX2lpGu_OQVQOK3X-8zS_3dE_x2k, then go to https://www.facebook.com/ae911truth/videos/10155079274151269/ and continue from there. The rabbit-hole is astonishingly deep, as becomes clear in the above-mentioned documentary, too.)

At this point in time, most people appear to agree that there is something wrong with the 9-11 story, as it has been brought to us. But I have a feeling that not many people let its huge implications sink in. Controlled demolition means: months, if not years, of preparation before the event; the ones who were (instantly and out of the blue) blamed for it didn’t do it; the ones who did do it got away with it, which means that they must be incredibly powerful and wealthy; they have ever since had many years to concoct more evil, and it is only logical to assume that they have. Think of the Bilderberg Conferences and the Bohemian Grove gatherings, etc. In the course of a number of years, while orchestrating new compositions or preparing orchestral parts, I listened to many audios and videos about this topic and related ones. I gradually discovered that the rabbit-hole goes all the way to Luciferianism, (generational) child abuse, human sacrifice, trauma-based mind control and the like. The whole picture is absolutely horrendous, but it is confirmed by lots and lots of witness testimonies on the internet. I have seen many such testimonies been deleted by MSM forces, by the way, only to be replaced by uploading new copies somewhere else and by ever more new testimonies. One of the many places where such testimonies can be found is at https://www.itnj.org/, and the many ITNJ videos that can be found on YouTube. Correction, My 2020: ITNJ just announced that YouTube will remove their channel, so better go to their backup channel https://www.bitchute.com/channel/DEmNbmcPHQoE/.

I then came across the Hampstead Satanic Ritual Abuse case, in early 2015. This isn’t the place to go into this in detail. I only want to point out here that also here the official narrative doesn’t make much sense. I came into contact with Sabine McNeill, one of the protagonists in this story, and I have been in correspondence with her to this day. She is now 74 and disabled and has by now served two years of a nine-year prison sentence, for ‘harassment’ (read: standing up against the abovementioned network). I composed the song ‘Das Leben, das ich selbst gewählt’ for her:

and also cycle of five Kafka songs (https://www.eduarddeboer.org/funf-lieder-nach-texten-franz-kafkas-five-songs-after-texts-by-franz-kafka-version-for-baritone-and-large-symphonic-wind-orchestra-op-86a/), to be premiered soon after the dying down of the virus panic.

Why do I post this now? Because things are now ramping up dramatically, as indeed I came across on the internet that they would in 2020. The you-know-what virus, in tandem with the roll-out of 5G, appears to be indeed the ‘crowning’ achievement in bringing about a global problem-reaction-solution chain of events that may well result in draconian government measures and a so-called ‘New World Order’ police state. Please set aside that David Icke is primarily associated with shapeshifting reptilians and listen to this video: https://www.davidicke.com/article/565475/post-coronavirus-future-injectable-biosensors-virus-detection-robots-cashless-society. The future (?) vaccine as a ‘cure’ for the corona virus may well be far more dangerous than the virus itself.

Some points to conclude with:

  • Who still believes that the news from the MSM is trustworthy, please listen to Udo Ulfkotte’s testimony (he is mentioned in the documentary as well) and/ or read his book ‘Verkaufte Journalisten’ (Bought Journalists) and continue your research from there.
  • Another indication of MSM mass mind manipulation is the Gretta Thunberg phenomenon, whereby the very real problem of environment pollution is reduced to a non-existing CO2 problem, the term ‘global warming’ has been replaced by ‘climate change’, electric cars are being heavily – and misguidedly – promoted (https://www.theaustralian.com.au/inquirer/extra-emissions-are-the-dirty-little-secret-of-electric-cars/news-story/4b11b81eb4ac66f0ea7dfec5a0e0cca1?fbclid=IwAR3E7tSy07gSnvKkiBXnT1wRpeZiAJ1-Qu3lpb02tssEH-Y_RsM12q5KLpM), people are being told to be very afraid and by implication we are being given the message that there too many people living on this planet (→ the creepy texts on the Georgia Guidestones).
  • Kudos for Shaun Attwood and his many videos about the late Jeffrey Epstein. As will become clear when you go through the material presented here, Epstein was a member of a large network whereby sex with underage girls and boys is part of a widespread blackmail system – and this was only the least of his crimes. Attwood is doing his part in bringing to light this aspect of what needs to come to light and then stopped. Henri Dutroux, Jimmy Savile, Harvey Weinstein, the Clintons and many others, including royalty members of several countries, were / are part of this same system and network. Kudos also for the brave Sonia Poulton, who has been interviewed three times now by Shaun Attwood. She absolutely nails it and she is strongly motivated by a desire to let the satanic system that is so utterly harmful to children, stop. I highly recommend watching this three-part series.
  • Satanism and the music industry, see for instance: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=otSSwS_Nh9A. (yes, Johnny Depp is involved, too, like so many others; and Say10, of course, is pronounced as Satan). Or for instance: https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=95MttFz1Yw0 (Konceal – Adrenochrome).
  • Some more persons giving their testimonies are Roland Bernard and Fiona Barnett. And many more, again visit the ITNJ website.
  • I can’t emphasize the importance of compassion enough, once the dam breaks and all this information hits the masses. The first reaction will understandably be shock and outrage. However, imagine how you would be when you would have been subjected to generational trauma-based mind control from even before birth, including rape and torture? To find out more about his phenomenon, go to for instance: https://deprogramwiki.com/, and from there to for instance Svali’s testimony or U.W. Ozian’s horrific book ‘Chainless Slaves’ (https://deprogramwiki.com/deprogramwiki-data/uploads/ChainlessSlaves.pdf).
  • I do not claim to be right in every detail. I may well be wrong here and there, and regarding many points, I actually hope I am.
  • Also feel free to spread this article, don’t even bother to mention me if you prefer not to. I don’t mind. Spreading the information is what is important. Now more than ever.

To end on a positive note: I do agree think that eventually all will end well. Simply because the universe is designed in such a way that the power of love will always overcome. Everything will, sooner or later, Come To Light:

May it be soon. In the meantime, staying positive is of crucial importance. Life is wonderful, also today!

Übers Niederträchtige (Acht Lieder nach Texten von Goethe und Shakespeare) About Baseness (Eight Songs after texts by Goethe and Shakespeare). Version for Mezzo Soprano, Tenor and Symphonic Wind Orchestra Op. 87 nr. 1

I. Satan ist schon lang’ ins Fabelbuch geschrieben (Satan has long ago been written off to fable-books)
II. Niedertracht (Baseness)
III. Kommt, ihr Geister (Come, you spirits)
IV. Sie hat mich beleidigt
V. Verleumdung (Defamation)
VI. Ausbruch (Outburst)
VII. Nichts ist gewonnen, alles ist dahin (Nought’s had, all’s spent)
VIII. Wanderers Gemütsruhe (The traveller’s peace of mind)

The texts of the songs (German / English) can be viewed and downloaded here.

The topic of this song cycle is baseness, which in the end does nothing but raise some dust – at least according to the great master of literature Goethe in the closing lines of his poem Wanderers Gemütsruhe (The traveller’s peace of mind), with which the cycle ends. There is a little story underlying the choice of texts of Goethe and Shakespeare and their order; a story about evil forces intent on bringing about the downfall of the person that is the protagonist of song number VI and whom we will duly call Miranda.

  1. The opening song: Satan ist schon lang’ ins Fabelbuch geschrieben (Satan has long ago been written off to fable-books), on texts by Goethe, is a general introduction, as sung by the chorus of a classical Greek drama.
  2. Niedertracht (Baseness). Iago pretends to be nice to Miranda, while in fact he is only secretly looking for possibilities to bring her down.
  3. Kommt, ihr Geister (Come, you spirits). Lady Macbeth invokes evil spirits to assist her in her intent.
  4. Sie hat mich beleidigt (She hath wronged me). Gerald-John Shallow, Esquire, has a very delicate nature which is all too easily offended. Initially sympathizing with Miranda, he decides to join forces with Lady Macbeth and Iago while whimpering about a supposed insult.
  5. Verleumdung (Defamation). Eventually, the evil forces bring Miranda to court, where their lawyer Lucio presents his list of accusations.
  6. Ausbruch (Outburst). Gentle Miranda can’t take it any longer. She erupts into anger, in plain but eloquent Shakespearian terms.
  7. Nichts ist gewonnen, alles ist dahin (Nought’s had, all’s spent). This text is an example that shows the depth of Shakespeare’s insight in universal laws: a desired result never brings satisfaction, when obtained by ill-gotten means.
  8. Wanderers Gemütsruhe (The traveller’s peace of mind). The Greek chorus closes the cycle, again with words of a general nature by Goethe.

The musical themes of the songs have been derived from medieval melodies to songs texts from the 13th century Codex Buranus, mostly in a way similar to how I used them in  my choral song cycle Cantica Aviditatis (Songs of Greed).

This song cycle is as it were a prequel to my instrumental composition Via ad Veniam (The Way to Forgiveness), with which it shares the same opus number and the starting point of freely using melodies from the medieval Carmina Burana.

Youtube (soundfile):

Third performance of Amara Tanta Tyri

Aanstaande zaterdag 16 november: de Oost-Nederlandse première van mijn compositie Amara Tanta Tyri, voor twee piano’s en symfonisch blaasorkest. Solisten zijn wederom de gebroeders Martijn en Stefan Blaak. Harmonieorkest Sint jan uit Wierden staat onder de deskundige leiding van Egbert van Groningen. Ik kijk er naar uit!

Concerto for Contrabass and Symphony Orchestra, Op. 54a

The sheet music of this composition can be purchased either at sonolize.com or by contacting me directly.
More about this composition can be read here.

With this contrabass concerto a wish dating from my student years has become reality. Henk Guldemond, at the time leader of the Concertgebouw Orchestra’s contrabass section, invited me to discuss with him the possibilities of the contrabass and of a concerto for this instrument. In the end, this didn’t amount to anything, but the idea remained in the back of my head; together with the intention to start a future contrabass concerto with a piccolo solo.

More than 25 years after this conversation, the idea was realized after all. I suggested writing a concerto for contrabass and wind orchestra to contrabassist Peter Leerdam – at the time a fellow student of mine – and to conductor Josef Suilen and wind orchestra ‘Sint Jan’ from the Dutch town of Wierden. The idea was received so favourably, that a commission could be realized, owing to great efforts on the part of Sint Jan’s and to benevolent grants from the Rabobank Noord-West Twente, the foundation for amateur music ‘De Kunstfactor – Unisono’ and the foundation ‘De Noaber van Wierden’.

The composition is in one movement and largely monothematic. The music has been cast into a sonata form, with a short Adagio inserted between the exposition and the development and a cadenza for the solo instrument halfway the recapitulation. I made grateful use of a number of ideas and suggestions of Peter Leerdam.

In 2019, I transcribed the concerto for contrabass and small symphony orchestra, partly because my son Benjamin expressed the wish to perform it as part of his Master test examination. He did so June 27th, 2019, in the Witte de With Theatre in Rotterdam, having assembled orchestra of students all by himself, conducted by Leonard Kwon.

Youtube:

There is also a version for contrabass and symphon orchestra, and also a reduction for contrabass and piano.

Score and parts of Via ad Veniam for fanfare orchestra now available (in Dutch)

Partituur en partijen van Via ad  Veniam voor fanfareorkest zijn nu verkrijgbaar als pdf materiaal bij Opus 33 Music, door een e-mail te sturen naar eduard.menno.de.boer@gmail.com.

De prijzen zijn, incl. 9% BTW: € 174,40 voor partituur + partijen; € 40,33 voor alleen de partituur.

Gedeelten uit de partituur kunnen hier worden bekeken en gedownload.

Hier kan alvast een elektronische opname worden beluisterd, als hulp bij de instudering:

Verder voert het Gelders Fanfare Orkest o.l.v. Erik vd Kolk het werk uit op 12 oktober, 19.30 u. in  tennishal de Staver te Sommelsdijk, op 16 november, 20.00 u.  in Utrecht in het ZIMICtheater en op 30 november, 21.00 u. in Veluvine in Nunspeet, beide keren o.l.v. Ivan Meylemans. Zie hier de agenda van het GFO.

Via ad Veniam (The Road to Forgiveness). For fanfare orchestra, Op. 87 nr. 2

In opdracht van Stichting Frysk Fanfare Festival voor de Open Nederlandse Fanfare Kampioenschappen 2020
Opgedragen aan iedereen die de weg naar vergeving heeft ingeslagen of nog gaat inslaan

Gedeelten uit de partituur kunnen hier worden bekeken en gedownload.  Partituur en partijen kunnen als pdf materiaal worden verkregen bij Opus 33 Music, door een e-mail te sturen naar eduard.menno.de.boer@gmail.com.

De prijzen zijn, incl. 9% BTW: € 174,40 voor partituur + partijen; € 40,33 voor alleen de partituur.

Inleiding

Nadat de Stichting Frysk Fanfare Festival me had gepolst of ik voor de Open Nederlandse Fanfare Kampioenschappen 2020 het verplichte werk wilde componeren, had ik al vrij snel een idee waar het werk over zou gaan: over het proces van vergeving en diverse stadia op weg daar naartoe. Maar het duurde een tijd voordat ik ‘op een rijtje’ had, welke stadia ik muzikaal wilde uitbeelden. Dat gebeurde opeens, toen ik op een ochtend mijn vrouw in de tuin bezig zag met het verbranden van stapels paperassen die verbonden waren met onverkwikkelijke en voor haar schadelijke gebeurtenissen.

Dat was de ontbrekende schakel die ik zocht!

Niet alleen de ervaringen van mijn vrouw vormden de inspiratiebron voor het werk, ook de spreuk in forgiveness lies the stoppage of the wheel of karma uit de boekenreeks The Law of One vond en vind ik inspirerend. In die zin is deze compositie een vervolg op mijn compositie Vita Aeterna Variaties, die een rondgang van het wiel van karma als onderwerp heeft.

Via ad Veniam betekent: de weg naar vergeving. De compositie is gebaseerd op twee middeleeuwse melodieën uit de Carmina Burana Codex, te weten Procurans Odium

en Stabilitas.

De eerste liedtekst gaat er over dat aangedaan onrecht uiteindelijk en achteraf vaak een blessing in disguise blijkt te zijn, de tweede dat stabilitas, standvastigheid, zich niet van z’n pad laat afbrengen, ongeacht wat er gebeurt. Met dit als uitgangspunt verklankt deze compositie allerlei stadia, vanaf de duisternis die aangedaan onrecht met zich meebrengt tot aan het uiteindelijke accepteren en loslaten ervan. De in totaal acht delen gaan allemaal in elkaar over. Hier is een beknopt overzicht:

  1. Tenebrae (Duisternis). Een ‘donderslag bij heldere hemel’ wordt gevolgd door een versie van Procurans Odium in een tweedelige maatsoort.
  2. Incubo (Nachtmerrie). Een variatie op het Procurans Odium thema, met flarden van onrustige snelle passages en vervreemdende klanken.
  3. Turbinis oculus (Het oog van de orkaan). Midden in de nachtmerrie kondigt het Stabilitas thema zich aan. Onder invloed hiervan trekt de nachtmerrie muziek zich geleidelijk terug.
  4. Desperatio (Wanhoop). Een variant van het begin keert terug, met een variatie op het begin van het Procurans Odium thema. Dit is hier getransformeerd tot een versie in een driedelige maatsoort, hetgeen een sterker gevoel van welbevinden geeft, al komt dat in deze variatie nog niet tot uiting: hier klinkt het te midden van verwarring en chaos, en gedachten die in een kringetje blijven ronddraaien.
  5. Dolor (Smart). Het Stabilitas thema wordt hier afgewisseld met de driedelige maatsoort versie van het Procurans Odium thema.
  6. Ira (Woede). Opnieuw een variatie op het Procurans Odium thema, nu weer in een tweedelige maatsoort, hier afgewisseld met het bekende Gregoriaanse Dies Irae thema.
  7. Ritu ardoris (Rituele verbranding). Niet alleen de tweedelige versie van het Procurans Odium thema gaat in louterende vlammen op, ook allerlei motieven, verbonden met negatieve gevoelens, uit de vorige delen worden aan de elementen prijsgegeven.
  8. Acceptio (Acceptatie). De Stabilitas melodie wordt afgewisseld met de driedelige versie van de Procurans Odium melodie. Van het vlammen-motief is hier en daar nog een rustige triolenbeweging overgebleven.

Eduard de Boer, 3 – 4 – 2019

Youtube:

Score and parts of Vita Aeterna Variations, version for symphonic wind orchestra now available

At last, score and parts of my Vita Aeterna Variations, version for symphonic wind orchestra, have become available for purchase as pdf material. The prices are, incl. 9% VAT: € 209 for a score and a complete set of parts, and € 40, 33 for only the score.

First recording of the version for symphonic wind orchestra of my Vita Aeterna Variations, performed the 11th of November, 2018, in the St. Valentine Church of the Swiss town of Rüthi, by the Sinfonisches Blasorchester Vorarlberg, conducted by Thomas Ludescher:

Please note the following:
– this recording was made with a simple device.
– the acoustics of the church necessitated slower tempi than indicated.
– it was very cold in the church, as a result of which the first oboist had water in the keyholes of his instrument in the fugue.

In spite of this, the performance certainly has its merits, and this recording gives a good overall impression of the composition.

There are also versions for brass band, Op. 62 no. 2 (Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5_gBREJL3k), for symphony orchestra and for fanfare orchestra (Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRCVIMSFP0M&t=84s).er

Award of the Premio de Santa Cecilia 2018 of the Asociación de Amigos de la Música de Yecla

Sunday the 2nd of December, during the Concierto Extraordinario de Santa Cecilia, the Asociación de Amigos de la Música de Yecla awarded me with the Premio Santa Cecilia 2018.

 This award is given annually since 2005 and recognizes the work of any person, group or entity promoting knowledge and enjoyment of Music.

The following video, made by the Department of Communication and Press of the Association of Friends of Music of Yecla, provides information about my relationship with Yecla:

I wasn’t told beforehand, so for me this was a huge sur-prize!

Fünf Lieder nach Texten Franz Kafkas (Five Songs after Texts by Franz Kafka). Version for baritone and large symphonic wind orchestra, Op. 86a

This song cycle could be composed thanks to a contribution called Werkbijdrage Muziekauteur (Work Contribution Music Author) of the Dutch Fonds voor de Podiumkunsten (Fund for the Podium Arts).

Dedicated to Wind Orchestra Concordia Obbicht and their conductor Alex Schillings, and to Sabine McNeill

The first performance should have taken place March 27, 2020 in the Sint Willibrorduskerk, Obbicht, The Netherlands. Unfortunately, the pandemic situation has caused the premiere to be postponed.

I.   Die Verhaftung (The Arrest)
II.  Gruppenverhalten (Group Behaviour)
III. Erlösung in einem Traum (Salvation in a Dream)
IV. Weg von hier! (Away from here!)
V.  Nach dem Gewitter (After the Thunderstorm)

Many stories of the famous writer Franz Kafka deal with the anxiety, alienation and powerlessness of an individual against a nonsensical, blind authority. His surreal stories have even resulted in the emergence of the word Kafkaesque, to describe the absurdity of what happens to such an individual and the hopelessness of his situation. For this song cycle, I searched Kafka’s oeuvre for texts fitting the situation of a so-called whistleblower: an informant who exposes wrongdoing, mostly within the organisation where he or she is working, in the hope of stopping it.

I know what it feels like to be a whistleblower, as I have been one myself, in the 90s of the previous century. This had to do with the predecessor of the Dutch state fund which enabled me to write this composition. It was called Fonds voor de Scheppende Toonkunst, which roughly translates as Fund for the Creation of Music. Research and analysis of this fund’s annual reports led me to the conclusion that the composers who received most of the (public) funding were largely the same ones as could be found in the management board and / or in the advisory committees. And on top this, the composers in the board had a say in which composer would be asked to take part in the advisory committee to decide about the next round of applications. When my findings went public, I went through the ordeal that whistleblowers usually go through, and this isn’t the place to go into detail about this. Suffice it to say that this experience resulted in compositions like the secular oratorio Der Förderverein, the third part of my choral song cycle Cantica Aviditatis and my ‘conceptual experiment’ Bubbles.

This story pales into insignificance compared to what happened to one of the dedicatees of this composition and the dedicatee of its version for baritone and piano: the 74 year old German / British mathematician and human rights campaigner Sabine McNeill, who at this moment is imprisoned for exposing systemic child abuse within the U.K. She can be viewed on Youtube, speaking in the EU Parliament about this theme.

That systemic child abuse and child trafficking is rampant, not just in the U.K., but all over the globe, especially within circles of the highest power, is something that few people want to know or even think about. Most people prefer to look the other way. A few years ago, I came to the conclusion that, being a composer, I can contribute to spreading awareness of this phenomenon by writing compositions about it. So far, however, such compositions have hardly been performed or not at all. But never mind, this composition is the next one in the series. And helping spread awareness about these abhorrent practices is necessary in order to make them stop.

In the preface to the score of Coming to Light, one of these earlier compositions, I added a number of Youtube links to prove my point. However, more and more of the Youtube films in question are now being taken down – only to be replaced by more and more new ones, by the way – rendering the links I provided useless. All the more happy am I with the foundation in 2015 of the International Tribunal for Natural Justice I.T.N.J., a judicial commission of inquiry into human trafficking and child sex abuse. I invite everyone who wants to know more about (the depth of) this rabbit hole simply to search for ITNJ on Youtube and experience the cumulative effect of the large and growing number of testimonies.

To return to this song cycle, it describes various occurrences that may happen to a whistleblower and his / her ensuing states of mind:

I: Die Verhaftung (The Arrest). A whistleblower may be arrested, on sometimes trumped-up charges. The text is from the beginning of Kafka’s famous novel Der Prozess (The Trail) and the absurdity of the conversation is underlined by the bizarre waltz that follows it.

II: Gruppenverhalten (Group Behaviour). In many cases, a whistleblower is fired, while his / her colleagues prefer to look the other way. I took the liberty to ‘borrow’ the Leitmotiv of the ‘small evil’ from Prokofiev’s opera The Fiery Angel to depict the usurper helmsman.

III. Erlösung in einem Traum (Salvation in a Dream) is about yearning for death, under the pressure of the circumstances.

IV: Weg von hier! (Away from here!) in this musical setting is about the urge to fly from the circumstances that blowing a whistle can bring about. This song is followed by a postlude depicting a thunderstorm, not unlike the one that Shakespeare described so beautifully in his play King Lear.

V: Nach dem Gewitter (After the Thunderstorm). I couldn’t resist the temptation to end this cycle on a positive note, with a musical setting of the only positive and self-asserting text that I could find in Kafka’s oeuvre – admittedly the short story where this text has been taken from ends with the collapse of the protagonist’s exuberant feeling, but Kafka did write these lines nonetheless – as I feel that we are living in times of transformation, where human consciousness is gradually growing and ever more is coming to light. May the endeavours of Sabine McNeill and many others contribute to this expansion, and may also this little musical offering help with this.

There is also a version for baritone and piano, Op. 86. The beginning of this version, including the texts I selected and set to music, can be viewed here.

Fünf Lieder nach Texten Franz Kafkas (Five Songs after Texts by Franz Kafka). Version for baritone and piano, Op. 86

This song cycle could be composed thanks to a contribution called Werkbijdrage Muziekauteur (Work Contribution Music Author) of the Dutch Fonds voor de Podiumkunsten (Fund for the Podium Arts).

Dedicated to Sabine McNeill

I.   Die Verhaftung (The Arrest)
II.  Gruppenverhalten (Group Behaviour)
III. Erlösung in einem Traum (Salvation in a Dream)
IV. Weg von hier! (Away from here!)
V.  Nach dem Gewitter (After the Thunderstorm)

Many stories of the famous writer Franz Kafka deal with the anxiety, alienation and powerlessness of an individual against a nonsensical, blind authority. His surreal stories have even resulted in the emergence of the word Kafkaesque, to describe the absurdity of what happens to such an individual and the hopelessness of his situation. For this song cycle, I searched Kafka’s oeuvre for texts fitting the situation of a so-called whistleblower: an informant who exposes wrongdoing, mostly within the organisation where he or she is working, in the hope of stopping it.

I know what it feels like to be a whistleblower, as I have been one myself, in the 90s of the previous century. This had to do with the predecessor of the Dutch state fund which enabled me to write this composition. It was called Fonds voor de Scheppende Toonkunst, which roughly translates as Fund for the Creation of Music. Research and analysis of this fund’s annual reports led me to the conclusion that the composers who received most of the (public) funding were largely the same ones as could be found in the management board and / or in the advisory committees. And on top this, the composers in the board had a say in which composer would be asked to take part in the advisory committee to decide about the next round of applications. When my findings went public, I went through the ordeal that whistleblowers usually go through, and this isn’t the place to go into detail about this. Suffice it to say that this experience resulted in compositions like the secular oratorio Der Förderverein, the third part of my choral song cycle Cantica Aviditatis and my ‘conceptual experiment’ Bubbles.

This story pales into insignificance compared to what happened to the dedicatee of this composition: the 74 year old German / British mathematician and human rights campaigner Sabine McNeill, who at this moment is imprisoned for exposing systemic child abuse within the U.K. She can be viewed on Youtube, speaking in the EU Parliament about this theme.

That systemic child abuse and child trafficking is rampant, not just in the U.K., but all over the globe, especially within circles of the highest power, is something that few people want to know or even think about. Most people prefer to look the other way. A few years ago, I came to the conclusion that, being a composer, I can contribute to spreading awareness of this phenomenon by writing compositions about it. So far, however, such compositions have hardly been performed or not at all. But never mind, this composition is the next one in the series. And helping spread awareness about these abhorrent practices is necessary in order to make them stop.

In the preface to the score of Coming to Light, one of these earlier compositions, I added a number of Youtube links to prove my point. However, more and more of the Youtube films in question are now being taken down – only to be replaced by more and more new ones, by the way – rendering the links I provided useless. All the more happy am I with the foundation in 2015 of the International Tribunal for Natural Justice I.T.N.J., a judicial commission of inquiry into human trafficking and child sex abuse. I invite everyone who wants to know more about (the depth of) this rabbit hole simply to search for ITNJ on Youtube and experience the cumulative effect of the large and growing number of testimonies.

To return to this song cycle, it describes various occurrences that may happen to a whistleblower and his / her ensuing states of mind:

I: Die Verhaftung (The Arrest). A whistleblower may be arrested, on sometimes trumped-up charges. The text is from the beginning of Kafka’s famous novel Der Prozess (The Trail) and the absurdity of the conversation is underlined by the bizarre waltz that follows it.

II: Gruppenverhalten (Group Behaviour). In many cases, a whistleblower is fired, while his / her colleagues prefer to look the other way. I took the liberty to ‘borrow’ the Leitmotiv of the ‘small evil’ from Prokofiev’s opera The Fiery Angel to depict the usurper helmsman.

III. Erlösung in einem Traum (Salvation in a Dream) is about yearning for death, under the pressure of the circumstances.

IV: Weg von hier! (Away from here!) in this musical setting is about the urge to fly from the circumstances that blowing a whistle can bring about. This song is followed by a postlude depicting a thunderstorm, not unlike the one that Shakespeare described so beautifully in his play King Lear.

V: Nach dem Gewitter (After the Thunderstorm). I couldn’t resist the temptation to end this cycle on a positive note, with a musical setting of the only positive and self-asserting text that I could find in Kafka’s oeuvre – admittedly the short story where this text has been taken from ends with the collapse of the protagonist’s exuberant feeling, but Kafka did write these lines nonetheless – as I feel that we are living in times of transformation, where human consciousness is gradually growing and ever more is coming to light. May the endeavours of Sabine McNeill and many others contribute to this expansion, and may also this little musical offering help with this.

The beginning of the score, including the texts I selected and set to music, can be viewed here.

I first composed the songs for baritone and piano, after which I arranged them for baritone and large wind orchestra, especially for the large range of instruments of the symphonic wind orchestra Concordia from the Dutch town Obbicht, whose conductor Alex Schillings proved to be enthusiastic about the idea. With his help, I could obtain a contribution called Werkbijdrage Muziekauteur (Work Contribution Music Author) from the Dutch Fonds voor de Podiumkunsten (Fund for the Podium Arts), which enabled me to write both versions of this song cycle.

There is also a version for baritone and symphonic wind orchestra, Op. 86a